THE MORRIGAN

WHO IS THE MORRÍGAN?

 

The Morrígan is most well known as an Irish Goddess who often appears in crow or raven form, and is associated with battle, warriors, sovereignty, prophecy, and Otherworld power. Though early source literature referencing Her only exists in Irish, folklore and archaeological records suggest that She, or closely related divinities, were known and worshiped in Britain and Gaul as well, suggesting that we have in Her a pan-Celtic Goddess.

 

 

MORRÍGAN: GREAT QUEEN

The Morrígan’s name translates from the Irish as ‘Great Queen’ (from Old Irish mór=great and rígan=Queen). This name is a key to Her nature, showing that sovereignty and queenship are core aspects of Her identity and power. Some scholars have given the name an alternate etymology, translating it as ‘Phantom Queen’ (from proposed Proto-Celtic *mor, connoting terror/nightmare, or *mar, connoting the dead). It should be noted that popular etymologies interpreting the Morrígan’s name as connoting ‘Sea Queen’ (via the Welsh mor=sea) and connecting Her to the Arthurian character Morgan le Fay, are incorrect.

As one of the Celtic sovereignty Goddesses, the Morrígan has an association with the land itself, and the rulership and protection of the land and its people. Her seasonal appearances are linked to rituals of warfare and sovereignty as they appear to have been practiced in early Irish society. Archaeological and literary evidence suggests that her earliest manifestations may have been as a tribal/territorial Goddess, and that Her war-bringing and martial functions arose out of this sovereignty and tutelary role.

As the Morrígan is best documented in the Irish literature,…

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Morrigan, The Great Celtic Goddess

I had posted this in a few other forums, some of you may have already seen this. I hope this information will be beneficial and informative and perhaps she will resonate with some of you.

Morrigan is one of the great Goddesses of Ireland and is a multifaceted Goddess. She is one as Morrigan and many, a trinity as “The Morrigan or the “Morrigu”. She is a shape shifter known for being a Goddess of war and battle, the cycle of life and death, and is also associated with wisdom and prophecy, magick and the land, among other aspects.

Culture and Origins:

To truly gain a more insightful understanding of who Morrigan is, it is important to understand Celtic culture of that era. The Celts idolized warfare, and women were warriors up until 697 CE, often fighting in battle or helping the wounded. Protecting their families and their land (viewed as female) was a dominant aspect of the Celts pride and was reflected in the Morrigan.

Morrigan first appears in The Lebor Gabala Erenn (The Book of Invasions), dating back to 1150 CE, and is a pseudo-narrative of the history of Ireland that includes the arrival of the Celtic gods, the Tuatha De Danann, in Ireland and their later battle with the indigenous gods, the Fir Blogs. Interestingly, these stories were not recorded by the Irish Pagans. Celtic culture prized oral tradition and memorization, as it was an art form of storytelling. It was the Irish Christian monks, who were their descendants that preserved what they believed to be historical account.

Morrigan’s origins can be traced back to the Copper age megalithic …

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Morrigan

This article is about the Goddess Morrigan, whom archaeological evidence now tells us, dates back beyond the Copper age, and was the dominant Goddess of Europe called the Great Goddess. When I read the material about Morrigan, I suspected that there was more to her story, and that she was a transporter between life and death; a birth Goddess and a death Goddess in that she moved the soul through these cycles. Later writing seems to concentrate on her connection to death, but comes to view her, as warrior societies often do, in a way connected to their own needs (power, energy, enchantment and warfare). Some writing of course does not, she is seen as a healer, the protector of the land and the person who brings Arthur to power. I went through literary accounts of her to give a fuller picture of her, one that is I think more meaningful to many people, including myself.

Stone stelae with sculpted breasts have been discovered at Castelucio de Sauri, some with only breasts and a necklace as a marker. They date back to the Copper Age c.3000BC. In Spain, France, Portugal and England statues, menhirs and stone slabs frequently also display her eyes, her beak and sometimes her vulva. Parts of her seem hidden, then appearing, so as one looks at the pottery artefacts there is more and more of her to piece together. She is a bird goddess, an earth goddess, and her breasts not only nourish the living, they also regenerate the dead. Her breasts were believed to form the hills in County Kerry called Da Chich Annan (the paps of Anu). She is the Irish Morrigan, Goddess of Death and Guardian of the Dead. She has in these early Celtic representations, a bird’s head (often a crow, raven or vulture) and breasts, and on vessels depicting her there is a symbol for the number three. Sometimes three lines are connected and depict a triple energy that flows from her body, as she is giver and sustainer of life. Very early she is under stood to be a triple goddess, a shape shifter, a three part person. Her names are plentiful and sound like her original name.

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Lugh, Master of Skills by Patti Wigington

Similar to the Roman god Mercury, Lugh was known as a god of both skill and the distribution of talent. There are countless inscriptions and statues dedicated to Lugh, and Julius Caesar himself commented on this god’s importance to the Celtic people. Although he was not a war god in the same sense as the Roman Mars, Lugh was considered a warrior because to the Celts, skill on the battlefield was a highly valued ability. In Ireland, which was never invaded by Roman troops, Lugh is called sam ildanach, meaning he was skilled in many arts simultaneously.

Lugh Enters the Hall of Tara

In one famous legend, Lugh arrives at Tara, the hall of the high kings of Ireland. The guard at the door tells him that only one person will be admitted with a particular skill–one blacksmith, one wheelwright, one bard, etc. Lugh enumerates all the great things he can do, and each time the guard says, “Sorry, we’ve already got someone here who can do that.” Finally Lugh asks, “Ah, but do you have anyone here who can do them ALL?” At last, Lugh was allowed entrance to Tara.

The Book of Invasions

Much of the early history of Ireland is recorded in the Book of Invasions, which recounts the many times Ireland was conquered by foreign enemies. According to this chronicle, Lugh was the grandson of one of the Fomorians, a monstrous race that were the enemy of the Tuatha De Danann. Lugh’s grandfather, Balor of the Evil Eye,…

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Celtic God – Lugh, Master of Skills

Lug, Lugus/Lugos (Gaulish), Lugh Lámhfhada (Irish), Lleu Llaw Gyffes (Welsh), Lugaid/Lugaidh, Lonnansclech

Lugh (LOO) is a popular Celtic sun god known for his many skills.  Because of this, he was also called Lugh Lámhfhada (Lugh of the Long Arm), Lleu Llaw Gyffes (Lleu of the Skillful Hand), Samildánach (Skilled in All the Arts), Lonnbeimnech (fierce striker, sword-shouter) or Macnia (boy hero).

Lugh is thought to be a form of the pan-Celtic/Gaulish god Lugus/Lugos.  The ancient Romans associated Lugh with the Roman god Mercury/Greek Hermes, as well as Apollo through his association with Lugus.  It is also possible that Lugh/Lugus was also a triple god, comprising the Gaulish gods Esus, Toutatis and Taranis.

Lugh was known as a sun god and a fierce warrior.  He is also known as a god of storms, particularly thunderstorms.  He was associated with the raven, crow, and lynx, and had a magic hound.  Lugh possessed several magical weapons, including an invincible Spear, one of the treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann.  It is said that the Spear never missed its target and was so bloodthirsty it would…

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Tuatha Dé Danaan

Background:
After a great battle with the Formorians, where most of the Nemedians died, three groups managed to escape, and scattered around the world. One group worked hard to hone their skills and returned to Ireland under the aegis of the goddess Danu. Before their return, they had visited four great cities of the North. Falias, Gorias, Finias and Murias. In each city they added to their knowledge of science and craftsmanship, learning from the greatest sages. From each city they collected a magical treasure. From Falias they got the Lia Fáil, the stone of destiny, which roared when a rightful king took his seat upon it. From Gorias they brought the claíomh solais, or sword of destiny. From Murias came the cauldron of the Daghda, which could feed a host, however large, without ever being emptied. From Finias came the Sleá Bua, a magic spear.

Story of the Tuatha Dé Danaan:
Meanwhile, the Fir bolg had come to Ireland and settled there. A great mist descended on Western Connaught, and when it lifted the Firbolg discovered that a fortified camp had been built. They approached the fortifications, where they were met by a group of beautiful, tall, fair people. They curiously examined each other’s weapons. The weapons of the Tuatha were light, bright and sharp, and the weapons of the Fir bolg were blunt and heavy. They agreed that the two races should divide Ireland equally, and join to defend the territory against all newcomers. They bowed, and exchanged weapons.

The Fir bolg later decided to refuse their offer, and a battle commenced on the plains of MoyturaNuada, the king of the Tuatha Dé Danann, had his hand cut off, but they were ultimately victorious. They magnanimously allowed the Fir bolg to keep the province of Connaught, while the Tuatha occupied the rest. Because of his blemish, Nuada could no longer rule as king. The warrior Bres was crowned in his place. Bres was only half Tuatha Dé Danaan, his mother being a Formorian. Because of this relationship with them, Bres allowed the Formorians to impose taxes and to oppress the Tuatha Dé Danann. The Tuatha eventually deposed Bres and refused to pay the tribute, and so the Formorians prepared for battle.

Lugh, also of mixed ancestry, arrived at the fort of the Tuatha.

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Images of and More Information about the Goddess Cerriwen

Here is the link for the general search I did for the Goddess Cerriwen : Further Information About Cerriwen She is an interesting goddess to me because one of the things that are ascribed to her is being the keeper of the cauldron. Cerriwen also crosses over into other cultures pantheons.

To see more images of the Goddess Cerriwen on bing.com please click on this link: Images of Cerriwen

Cerridwen: Mother, Magician, and Crone from Old Welsh Mythology

An enchantress from Welsh mythology, Cerridwen is regarded as a woman of incredible power and magic.  She pervades Welsh and Irish culture as an emblem of wisdom and rebirth, remaining today as a Wiccan goddess of the pair, as well as of inspiration.  As a woman of fierce magical talent, Cerridwen’s story is interestingly less about herself and more about the children she bore.

Seen by many as a Mother Crone, Cerridwen is driven in the Welsh tales by a desire for her son’s success in life.  Also the mother of a beautiful young daughter named Creirwy with Tegid Foel, her boy Morfran is known for his immense physical hideousness.  Gaining him a promising future means counteracting this ugliness, so she does so by using her advanced magic to brew him a concoction of mental and spiritual intellect.

The owner of a magical cauldron is called Awen, directly translated as “inspiration”. Cerridwen decides to create a brew that would give her outwardly unlucky son brilliance beyond all measure.  It is a very particular potion, however, and has to boil for a year and a day for the drinker to achieve its full effects.  To protect her secret and the potion, Cerridwen ensures its fire is tended only by a blind man and that it is stirred only by a young boy named Gwion Bach.  Gwion, as many myths of such peculiar circumstances would have it, turns out to be the potion’s ultimate undoing.

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Images of and Other Information About The Horned God

This is the general search link I used to find the articles I posted: The Horn God General Search A warning goes with this link some of the articles that came up were for Satanism which contrary to popular belief is not all dark magic.

To view more images of The Horned God on bing.com please click on this link: The Horned God Images

I also used this link: The Horned God Images