Wheel of the Year

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Lammas Tisane- Ceremonial Tea

A images

Written for Coven Life

03/02/2020

By priestess Hypatia

 

Tea Anyone?

Tisanes are herbal tea that traditionally included barley.

Lammas

Lammas is the first harvest celebration, marking the transition from summer to fall and celebrating the bounty and abundance of the garden.

Spell crafting Herbal teas is a personal favorite of mine, especially herbs personally selected to reflect your intentions and the turning of the seasons. Such teas are a wonderful way to honor the seasons during your ceremony.

First harvest Tea Blend for Lammas

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup dried calendula blossoms
  • 1/4 cup dried lavender buds
  • 1/4 cup dried meadow sweet
  • 1/4 cup oolong tea leaves
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon dried grated ginger

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a tea strainer or bag.
  2. Pour hot water over the strainer and steep 3-5 minutes

 

Calendula– a beautiful bright beam of sunshine their bright orange and yellow petals are a beautiful representation of seasonal transitions.

Lavender– Often associated with Lammas, this beautiful plan ally will help you begin the descent into the waning and restful portion of the year.

Meadow sweet– All heal of the ancients. Acting as a natural pain killer because of its salicylic acid content, the same ingredient that makes aspirin. Wonderful for third eye activation, divination and honing of your skill.

Oolong– Adding a layer or complexity to this otherwise airy tea. Its earthiness encourages wisdom through reflection.

Ginger– Only a small amount is needed to reach its maximum benefit. Its distinct spicy notes encourages success, money and love.

Celebrate Lammas in the Southern Hemisphere with Recipes

Lammas_loaf_Owl_with_salt_eyes

Image from Wikipedia

In the Southern Hemisphere, we celebrate Lammas from 1-2 February. On the flip side of the world, the festival is celebrated on 1-2 August.

Lammas(Lah-mus) – Anglo Saxon – Festive of the loaves.
Lughnasadh (Loo-na-saw) – Irish Gaelic -This word roughly translates to Lugh’s Assembly. The god Lugh is known as the Celtic God of the Sun.
Lunasa (Loo-nah-sah) – Modern Irish – This is a more modern version of Lughnasadh.

To continue reading click on to: Lammas Recipes

 

HONORING LAMMAS – THE FIRST HARVEST

A brief history of Lammas

In Earth-based traditions, Lammas is usually celebrated on August 1, honoring the first harvest of the season. Lammas is also known as Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-NAS-ah). In some Wiccan and Pagan traditions, Lammas is also a day of honoring Lugh, the Celtic god of craftmanship, grain, the Sun, and late summer storms. Lughnasadh is still celebrated in many parts of the world today. At this time of year, the nights are beginning to lengthen and we anticipate the return of fall. This is truly the beginning of shadow season. Before the Wheel turns to the darker months, we can take time to appreciate warmth and sunlight and how they support the season of growth. Gratitude in times of plenty is a powerful practice. What we reap now wasn’t always full-grown. By celebrating Lammas as a harvest holiday, we honor our ancestors and the hard work they had to do in order to survive and secure our lineage.

Like all Celtic or Pagan holidays, Lammas also honors goddesses whose associations, strengths, and myths align with the work we’re doing at this time of year. Ceres, the harvest goddess, known as Demeter by the Greeks, and Tailtiu, mother of Lugh, are great forces of agricultural abundance. We receive their blessings in the bounty of food that will feed us through the rest of the year. Metaphorically, our mental, spiritual, and emotional crops are ready for the first harvest, too. If you set intentions in the darkness of winter or early spring, this is the time to see how they’ve manifested and will support you in the months to come.

To read the ritual ideas click here Lammas/Lughnasadh

Lugh, Master of Skills by Patti Wigington

Similar to the Roman god Mercury, Lugh was known as a god of both skill and the distribution of talent. There are countless inscriptions and statues dedicated to Lugh, and Julius Caesar himself commented on this god’s importance to the Celtic people. Although he was not a war god in the same sense as the Roman Mars, Lugh was considered a warrior because to the Celts, skill on the battlefield was a highly valued ability. In Ireland, which was never invaded by Roman troops, Lugh is called sam ildanach, meaning he was skilled in many arts simultaneously.

Lugh Enters the Hall of Tara

In one famous legend, Lugh arrives at Tara, the hall of the high kings of Ireland. The guard at the door tells him that only one person will be admitted with a particular skill–one blacksmith, one wheelwright, one bard, etc. Lugh enumerates all the great things he can do, and each time the guard says, “Sorry, we’ve already got someone here who can do that.” Finally Lugh asks, “Ah, but do you have anyone here who can do them ALL?” At last, Lugh was allowed entrance to Tara.

The Book of Invasions

Much of the early history of Ireland is recorded in the Book of Invasions, which recounts the many times Ireland was conquered by foreign enemies. According to this chronicle, Lugh was the grandson of one of the Fomorians, a monstrous race that were the enemy of the Tuatha De Danann. Lugh’s grandfather, Balor of the Evil Eye,…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Lugh, Celtic God of Craftsman

Celtic God – Lugh, Master of Skills

Lug, Lugus/Lugos (Gaulish), Lugh Lámhfhada (Irish), Lleu Llaw Gyffes (Welsh), Lugaid/Lugaidh, Lonnansclech

Lugh (LOO) is a popular Celtic sun god known for his many skills.  Because of this, he was also called Lugh Lámhfhada (Lugh of the Long Arm), Lleu Llaw Gyffes (Lleu of the Skillful Hand), Samildánach (Skilled in All the Arts), Lonnbeimnech (fierce striker, sword-shouter) or Macnia (boy hero).

Lugh is thought to be a form of the pan-Celtic/Gaulish god Lugus/Lugos.  The ancient Romans associated Lugh with the Roman god Mercury/Greek Hermes, as well as Apollo through his association with Lugus.  It is also possible that Lugh/Lugus was also a triple god, comprising the Gaulish gods Esus, Toutatis and Taranis.

Lugh was known as a sun god and a fierce warrior.  He is also known as a god of storms, particularly thunderstorms.  He was associated with the raven, crow, and lynx, and had a magic hound.  Lugh possessed several magical weapons, including an invincible Spear, one of the treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann.  It is said that the Spear never missed its target and was so bloodthirsty it would…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Lugh, Master of Skills

The Astrological Importance of Lughnasadh

The Fire Festival of Summer

The festival of Lughnasadh, later known as Lammas, is one of the four grand sabbats of witchcraft traditions, and one of the four sacred fire festivals of the Celtic peoples also celebrated by modern Pagans.  The four festivals all have fire playing a central role in some way.  Beltane and Samhain, the high holy days of modern witchcraft were traditionally centered around large bonfires or balefires of a sacrificial or celebratory nature.  During Imbolc, or Candlemas one of the only festivals frequently celebrated indoors we see the great fire and coming sun represented by candle flame.  Lughnasadh is directly across the wheel from Imbolc and during the hot-dry summer the fire of the Sun is already manifest in the sky above.  Sun disks or fire wheels were also used to symbolize the solar rays of the sun, often rolled downhill in representation of the Sun’s descent over the horizon.

To continue reading……